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Around 200 Afghans have already arrived in Vermont and another 80 are expected by April—for a total of 280—although that number could increase.

Afghan refugees arriving in Vermont need assistance acclimating to a new country. Vermont nonprofits and volunteers are stepping up, but more help is needed, including private resources to augment the patchwork of federal and state programs providing services and aid. Our new brief shares three actions you can take today to help.

IN THIS BRIEF, DISCOVER:

  • Vermont-based nonprofits providing support to new arrivals from Afghanistan
  • Three actions to take today to support Afghan refugees
  • Deeper reading for additional research
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